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The Politics of Transitional Justice in Latin America: Power, Norms, and Capacity Building

Ezequiel González Ocantos, Associate Professor in the Qualitative Study of Comparative Political Institutions, has published a new Cambridge Element. His work focuses on variations in transitional justice (TJ) outcomes in Latin American trials and truth commissions.

Abstract

How has Latin America pioneered the field of transitional justice (TJ)? Do approaches vary across the region? This Element describes Latin American innovations in trials and truth commissions, and evaluates two influential models that explain variation in TJ outcomes: the Huntingtonian and Justice Cascade approaches. It argues that scholars should complement these approaches with one that recognizes the importance of state capacity building and institutional change. To translate domestic/international political pressure and human rights norms into outcomes, states must develop 'TJ capabilities'. Not only should states be willing to pursue these highly complex policies, they must also develop competent bureaucracies.

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    Cover of 'The Politics of Transitional Justice in Latin America: Power, Norms, and Capacity Building'
Publishers Website
Dr Ezequiel González Ocantos is Associate Professor in the Qualitative Study of Comparative Political Institutions; Professorial Fellow, Nuffield College